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ABOUT THE MILLENNIUM FELLOWSHIP - CLASS OF 2022

United Nations Academic Impact and MCN are proud to partner on the Millennium Fellowship. Over 31,000 young leaders on 2,400+ campuses across 140+ nations applied to join the Class of 2022.  200+ campuses worldwide (just 8%) were selected to host the 3,000+ Millennium Fellows.

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UNITED NATIONS ACADEMIC IMPACT AND MCN PROUDLY PRESENT JACQUELINE CARSON BOHRER, A MILLENNIUM FELLOW FOR THE CLASS OF 2022.

University of California Berkeley | California, United States | Advancing SDG 10 & UNAI 3

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" "I believe in the power of imagination. I believe in the power of imagining a better world. I believe in the power of taking what began as imagination, and turning it into action. Our ideas have the power to create lasting change, if we are brave enough to share them. The work I do started as a simple thought, which then evolved into something that has the capability to change people's lives for the better. I do what I do because I believe it is our duty as human beings to imagine that our world can always be better, more just, and a place in which there is equal opportunity for all." "

Millennium Fellowship Project: G.I.F.T.E.D. Pre-Med

GIFTED Pre-Med is a project aiming to assist low-income and minority-identifying students with the financial hurdles of applying to medical school. We aim to diversify the healthcare field to more efficiently meet patients' needs by aiding those that may be deterred from applying simply due to circumstances larger than themselves. We work to meet our goal by fundraising to meet waive students' medical school application fees, donating MCAT study materials, and spreading awareness of social disparities and gender & racial equity through speaker events.

About the Millennium Fellow

Jacqueline Carson Bohrer, originally from Los Angeles, California, is a bright, ambitious, and passionate pre-medical student at the University of California, Berkeley. As a first-generation college student from a low-income background, she has always been an avid advocate for social justice in education. Upon starting college, she became well-educated in the systemic inequalities that oppress aspiring doctors from minority backgrounds. This inspired Jacqueline to join the American Medical Women's Association at Berkeley, where she became the head of the Diversity in Medicine Committee. With the desire to create lasting change, she started a nonprofit unincorporated association that is dedicated to alleviating the systemic barriers that discourage low-income and minority students from pursuing careers in medicine. She plans to continue her social justice initiatives in her professional career, and thus make significant contributions in the development of the United Nations' Sustainable Goals.

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